Category Archives: Japan

Strikings – applied patterns and theme

Notes from my Artist Studios of Fearrington Village preview tour…

 

Vidabeth Bensen

Original hand-pulled screen prints
— cards, calendars, t-shirts and framable prints

[#15 on the ASFV studio tour map]

(c) Vidabeth Bensen

(c) Vidabeth Bensen

    Of all the art techniques I have tried, I have to say print-making is probably the most difficult to pull off, second only to etching.  Vidabeth has triumphed over the process of enacting the multiple steps of designing the print, preparing the screen(s) and then inking and pulling in such a way there is no perceived effort evident.

   Vidabeth gave a mini tutorial on making the screens and shared her long teaching career outside the US, and her collections. Her discussion of the process and all she puts into it -as well as the prints’ blossoming from her experiences in Europe, Asia and the Middle East- leaves me in awe to know the finished prints are a just single pieces of paper.   

    I chose this image to highlight here for two important reasons. It displays multiples of the Chinese character for “Art” and, as I didn’t take the opportunity to buy a t-shirt she sells of this marking, this post is a great way to remember the image. The ink and background colors in this piece, as well as the texture of the paper it is on make it very conducive to a happy patch of bamboo.

 


 

Murry Handler

Award winning contemporary acrylics, bold ink-brush prints, diverse styles

[#19 on the ASFV studio tour map]

(c) Murry Handler

(c) Murry Handler

    I am presenting this partial image of one of the many paintings I fell in love with of Murry’s. This piece is both painting and illustration, both static and full of movement. As is Murry’s history. He began as tight-lined, deadline-oriented Illustrator and is now a free flowing, mistake forgiving artist wielding a dream brush. 

   I love the movement Murry’s splatters have as well as the clean-lined pine cones and needles. I also love the pine cones being the only objects with color, almost reminding me of the drapes Mom had years ago – this painting makes me smile with a bit of wistfulness.

   Over all, I believe Murry when he mentions how his paintings “take shape while [he is] semi-asleep.” The muscle memory he stored up after the years as an illustrator must allow him to jump past any pause of how to represent his thoughts- even if it is just a mere suggestion of an object. One can accept his brush shows him the way.

   ### 

INTRO VOICES KINETIC – STRIKINGS

Artist Studios of Fearrington Village Studio Tour 2015

I hope you are able to make it out to the First Ever Artists’ Studio at Fearrington Village —Please share your favorite Triangle artist in the comment section and perhaps I will introduce them here as well!

Fearrington, the first of the first

Artist Studios at Fearrington Village Open Studio Tour

Artist Studios at Fearrington Village Open Studio Tour APRIL 11 & 12 2015

Last weekend, I spent a fabulous morning on yet another art tour – the Media Preview of the very first Fearrington Village Artist Open Studio Tour! I was invited by Leslie Palmer (lesliepalmerfineart.com), one of the Fearrington Artists, who opened my eyes, broadened my blog boundaries, and made me an enthusiastic devotee of this very special Art Destination. Now, I’ve known of the Belties (but not the Beltie Goats!) and the Inn, built by R.B. Fitch, is legendary – and perhaps I ran across a recipe by one of the Chefs… but how I missed the fact that the entire development is an Art Destination was the prize of this Pittsboro puzzle! Fearrington background: Fearrington Village as an Art Destination is the vision of Artist Studios at Fearrington Village, the artists’ group. Leslie described to me how, when she was developing the ASFV Marketing plan, she learned it is “very unusual for an artists’ group to have one but we do and it is actually working!”   Following is the list of Fearrington Artists as I was introduced to them by Leslie that day – all of whom I would love to stay connected to when they are part of Salons or other shows.   And, Reynold, I need that cookie recipe!!  Smile

  • Forrest Greenslade (#2 on the ASFV map) – Highly stylized organic sculptures and paintings, derived from a life-long love of nature any mythology (and an AirBnB!)*
  • Vietta Maher (#3) – Playful Things, Kinetic sculptures and Reynold Ed Maher (#4) – Mixed-media, acrylic, oil pastel and watercolor pencil
  • Horty Jacobs (#13) – Enchanting necklaces to appeal to every taste: chic, elegant, bold, whimsical, extravagant (previous life as photographer of ‘old things forgotten’)
  • Vidabeth Bensen (#15) – Hand-screened original prints, cards, calendars and T-shirts
  • Murry Handler (#19) – contemporary acrylics, bold ink-brush prints ( illustrator background).

I will be presenting these artist in the following pairs. The images are taken from the ASFV brochure:

Voices: Forrest Greenslade’s sculptures and paintings from nature (professional voice)  and Reynold Maher’s mixed media paintings (reflections from his inner voice).

Greenslade

REMaher

Forrest Greenslade – forrest@organicforrestry.com

Reynold Ed Maher – ermaher@nc.rr.com

Kinetic*: Vietta Maher’s sculptures (fish, movement, ballerinas) and Horty Jacob’s necklaces (fishing lures and inherent but personal kinetics)

VMaher HJacobs
Vietta Maher – vietta.maher@gmail.com Horty Jacobs – horty@nc.rr.com

*alternate title: “Insights” – Vietta’s seeing everything in everything; Horty’s “seeing beauty in the faded, cracked, rusted surfaces transformed by the relentless power of time and elements” in her photography.

Strikings: Vidabeth Bensen’s printed and Murry Handler’s applied patterns – (duo-tri color themes)

VBenson MHand
Vidabeth Bensen – houseoflifeprints.com Murry Handler – mhand59333@embarqmail.com

Let us begin – and Thank You for coming along!  Look for my next blogs of my favorites pieces from these ASFV artists above (Voices, Kinetic and Stroke) in the next coming weeks.

###

Thank you’s and final thoughts … Our tour took roughly 3 hours to cover all six – please read the bios and preview the art online to plan your trip accordingly. I do not feel I spent enough time with these artists simply due to other demands on my time – perhaps I’ll make reservations at The Artists’ Garret at Fearrington to catch up with the others on another tour next visit! Personal note from Leslie: “I must mention that there are 20 artists opening their studios.. I have heard from several artists  who are disappointed that you were not able to visit theirs.. You are welcome to come back anytime! “ Thank you so much for this introduction to the artists of the Art Studios at Fearrington Village and this wonderful Art Destination, Leslie – we’ll be back! Thank you as always for accompanying me, Evelyn – always a joy and usually an adventure!!  :) -rj Randi Jean Veiberg Editor, ArtBlogTriangle.com

Layers and Lineage: A ‘round about, and home again

Abstract, Impressionist, and an introduction to new art and processes from four Fine Art artists

I planned to visit this particular gallery this month and was happy to have chosen Super Bowl Sunday (I normally ramble around galleries on Sunday afternoons –they’re quieter and I find less competition for viewing space -it is a selfish thing…). I was greeted not only by room after room of new and interesting paintings, jewelry, sculpture, pottery, photography –but also met and spoke with four of the 20 or so up and coming artists that make up the co-op, Roundabout Art Collective!

I moseyed around listening quietly to some discussion at the far end of the building for several minutes until I had made my way to one of the front rooms. I admit I’d seen so much art by the time I made it to that room (and, kids, the gallery building is not that big!) that I was happy to be welcomed by Yuko Taylor who engaged me in discussion about her paintings and some of the other artists’ work displayed elsewhere in that room. Yuko then introduced me to Sue Edmonson and Linda Kimball who were also at the gallery that afternoon. And, after my tour of the Roundabout, Yuko brought me over to Moondog Cottage, a nearby collection of studios she shares with a few more artists, one of which was Susan Dahlin who was working away on a new painting.

Back to Yuko – she has a very interesting  technique in her work in which she references historic photographs from the South and layers them with traditional themes and imagery from her Japanese heritage. The applied symbols and imagery, and her use of an overlaying/dripping technique in her oils, empower and ‘encourage’  the affect of allowing the past to dissolve to a new reality which is emblazoned with prayers and dreams of happiness, wealth and grace.

One Day II (c) 2013 Yuko Taylor

One Day II (c) 2013 Yuko Taylor

In “One Day II”, Yuko’s use of a very traditional crane image and symbolism act  as as both a foil to the child’s job as a sharecropper and a balancing reflection of the white of the cotton he’s bagging. I’m drawn to the myriad of visible layers in this painting as well as the cross symbolism style. For me, more than most of her works, this piece reminds me of a richly embroidered brocade.

Sue Edmonson was the next ‘host’ of my tour. She is a relatively new artist and has taken lessons from various instructors in the area. Sue paints many layers as she develops her paintings whether they are tree-scapes or visions of the night sky she enjoys as a lover of nature. In one of her tree paintings, I can really get a sense of the atmosphere you’d be standing in while viewing the trees in person. She’s also the 2nd snow painter I learned from that snow holds many more colors than just white which, in her painting, makes it seem all the surrounding earth and sky are within the snow.

Whirlpool Galaxy (c) 2013 Sue Edmonson

Whirlpool Galaxy (c) 2013 Sue Edmonson

In her work Whirlpool Galaxy, Sue shows how well she personalizes such an image normally only viewed from a NASA photograph and invites a long gaze at all the stars and depth she’s captured.

I also ‘met’ a new art technique up close that day, as well as the artist: The encaustic painting technique of layering melted beeswax and colored pigments. Linda Kimball starts with the wax and pigments and adds fabrics and layers of other embedded materials including, in some, gold-leaf.  Her encaustics appear fragile as melted wax but the process gives this work surprising toughness.

Elaine Still Life (c) 2013 Linda Kimball

Elaine Still Life (c) 2013 Linda Kimball

The image Linda sent for this post is “Elaine Still Life” which won 3rd Place in the recent Visual Art Exchange’s 29th Annual Art Auction & Gala Silent & Live Auction. Yay, Linda!  All of these encaustics’ layers of wax and imagery include “…a presence of ‘Elaine’”, a representation of her mother. Some of the ‘presences’ are quite visible, but some you’ll have to search for!  I particularly like the texture layer added to the fruit in this still life, and can really appreciate the dream quality she affects.

Yuko lastly brought me over to the Moondog Cottage and introduced me to more of her work and also to Susan Dahlin, who was working away at one of her newer pieces. Susan’s work is as individual as she is and she is a prolific contemporary painter –a “colorist” in her words. Susan paints in oils with a pallet knife and mixes her thickly applied paints on the canvas versus the pallet.

Still Standing (c) 2013 Susan Dahlin

Still Standing (c) 2013 Susan Dahlin

The piece I highlight here is at first glance quite muted when viewed near her other works but the contrast of the textured earth and stone tones against the smooth sky give it a nice energy – energy being another reflection of Susan’s personality.

Our State Magazine writes of Susan:  “…as each painting nears completion, she pulls out one of [her dad’s] old tubes and applies a little color from it. It’s a way, she says, ‘to stick a little bit of Dad in every painting’” –similarly embedding lineage as done in Linda’s encaustics and Yuko’s layering of heratige, and in the many layers of nature in Sue’s paintings.

Look for a link to the video from ‘Tarheel Traveler’ on her website from when her family artists visited – so fun for me to hear Norske accents again –Mom always did claim her as a daughter when we would see her on the TV…!

As if having all this eclectic collection of work and artists to meet isn’t enough for a visit, the Roundabout Art Collective also has a gift shop where the artists offer items for sale including small scale pieces, greeting card repro’s and even some sale items of full-scale work. Give yourself a lift with a visit to this gallery if you’re in need of a popping hot art gift, want to peruse armfuls of collections to brighten a not so sunny day,  or to meet the artists who can excite you about a potential investment in their art. You can find more info about each of these and the other 20 or so very interesting and welcoming artists online, but I hope you’ll take my suggestion and visit in person.

Question: Have you ever happened into a shop and found you’d happened upon a landscape that harmonized really well with your interests? Post your experience in the comments and drop me a link if you think I’d like to check it out on my trekking!